News

Are chips past the best before date?

Are chips past the best before date? After Morrisons changed the labeling on milk, supermarket bosses say dry snacks are also safe to eat after their best-before date – as shopper finds three months outdated pork crabs on store shelves

  • Dry snacks can still be eaten past their expiration date, bosses say
  • It means that the expiration date on some items may soon become obsolete
  • The opportunity comes after supermarket changes labeling on milk instead of waste










Popular snacks, including potato chips, could soon lose their sell-by dates as supermarkets and nutritionists say they’re safe to eat after their time.

The management of one of the UK’s largest stores says the Food Standard Agency guidelines say they can eat just fine, even past their best-before date.

The watchdog says chips and other products may not be of the best quality if consumed during this time, but they are still safe.

Stores are also legally allowed to sell items whose expiration date has passed.

It means that customers may be faced with more products that they think have gone wrong but are in reality perfectly safe.

A supermarket insider told MailOnline: ‘Without trying in any way to condone offering food for sale beyond its best before date, this is a quality issue rather than a safety issue.

‘Packages of chips and dry snacks can be safely eaten after the best-before date, but their taste and texture may not be as great.

“The FSA’s website describes it itself.”

A customer at a Morrisons in Bridlington found packages of pork crackling three months past their expiration date.

A customer at a Morrisons in Bridlington found packages of pork crackling three months past their expiration date.

The supermarket said the items should not have been on sale and had been taken off the shelves

The supermarket said the items should not have been on sale and had been taken off the shelves

Some of the 75p snacks were labeled with an expiration date of more than three months ago

Some of the 75p snacks were labeled with an expiration date of more than three months ago

Due to the possible shift in the importance of the best-before date, ‘use by dates’ for certain types of food could disappear completely.

According to FSA guidelines, the best before date of items is related to quality rather than a safety issue.

It states: ‘The best before date, sometimes shown as BBE (best before date), is about quality and not about safety.

‘The food is safe to eat after this date, but may not be at its best. The taste and texture may not be that good. Best before dates appear on a wide variety of foods, including frozen foods, dried foods, and canned foods.

“The best-before date is only correct if the food is stored according to the instructions on the package.”

On Sunday Morrisons said it was… to become the first UK supermarket to scrap the expiration date on milk to reduce food waste.

Morrisons will switch to expiration dates on 90 percent of milk bottles and cartons from January 31 [File photo]

Morrisons will switch to expiration dates on 90 percent of milk bottles and cartons from January 31 [File photo]

The company will switch to the expiration date on 90 percent of its milk bottles and cartons from Jan. 31 to encourage customers to throw it away only if it stinks — and see the date as no more than a guide to freshness.

Milk is the third most wasted food and drink product in the UK, with 490 million pints going down the drain every year. It also has the largest environmental footprint of food and drink due to the agriculture involved in its production.

One liter can account for up to 4.5kg of CO2 being pumped into the atmosphere – the equivalent of driving the average petrol car for 26 miles.

Research from the University of Chester found that milk from Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda and Morrisons, stored in a refrigerator at 4°C, is safe to drink for seven days after its expiration date.

Morrisons is scrapping the best-before date on British own-brand milk and that of the Danish supplier Arla, which together account for 90 percent of the turnover.

Yesterday a customer at a Morrisons in Bridlington found packages of pork crackling three months past their use-by date.

The store refunded the customer, saying they had been placed there incorrectly and should not have been on sale.

A spokesperson told MailOnline: “We are convinced it is an isolated issue and have taken immediate action with the store to ensure the products have been withdrawn from sale.”

Advertisement

.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button

Adblock Detected

GET MORE DOFOLLOW LINK